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Fisker lays off more employees as EV startup fights for survival

Fisker previously laid off some workers in January and February, and then another large group in mid-May. The number of employees affected in the latest layoffs wasn’t immediately clear.

Fisker

Bleeding electric vehicle startup Fisker is back in the news again. The money-losing carmaker is reportedly downsizing its workforce yet again. The cash strapped automaker has decided to cut more jobs at Fisker as the company fights for survival. Several teams throughout the company were affected.

Workers were caught off guard when they were suddenly denied access to employee email accounts and other internal systems Wednesday, indicating the start of another round of layoffs. Later in an internal meeting led by the automaker’s chief executive officer and founder Henrik Fisker, employees were informed of the decision to downsize the company further.

However, tensions flared during the all-hands meeting, where the company’s chief reportedly attempted to distance himself from the layoff decisions and shifted the responsibility onto the company’s chief restructuring officer John DiDonato. This frustrated some employees who felt a lack of accountability from leadership.

Despite the somber atmosphere during the meeting, Henrik Fisker emphasized the company’s commitment to continue selling its flagship electric vehicle, the Ocean SUV, to interested customers. He also hinted at the possibility of rehiring laid-off workers once the company stabilizes.

The move comes after a string of missteps by the electric carmaker, including failed efforts to raise new funding and production stoppages with manufacturing partner, Magna. Fisker previously laid off some workers in January and February, and then another large group in mid-May. The number of employees affected by Wednesday’s layoffs wasn’t immediately clear.

The automaker is also now further cutting expenses by ending direct-to-consumer vehicle sales to buyers in states where the company does not have stores. The money-losing carmaker is said to be in “survival mode” as it tries to arrange potential rescue deals. Despite positive reviews for its Ocean SUV, Fisker’s financial situation remains precarious. Henrik Fisker is slated to participate in the Economic Times Auto Tech Summit in June, where industry experts will discuss the future of electric vehicles.

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