./uploads/advanced-cache.php Microsoft caps Bing chats to five turns per session to avoid “confusing” the model

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Microsoft caps Bing chats to five turns per session to avoid “confusing” the model

Microsoft caps Bing chats to five turns per session to avoid “confusing” the model
Microsoft introduced its overhauled product – Bing – just a day after rival Google announced Bard.

 

American multinational tech major Microsoft has capped the artificial intelligence-powered chat experience on its recently revamped search engine Bing as it aims to address the issue of long chat sessions confusing the model. Hence, chats are now limited to five turns per session and 50 turns per day.

 

“After a chat session hits 5 turns, you will be prompted to start a new topic. At the end of each chat session, context needs to be cleared so the model won’t get confused. Just click on the broom icon to the left of the search box for a fresh start,” Microsoft said in a blog.

 

After integrating the technology used by OpenAI’s ChatGPT, Microsoft recently unveiled a revamped version of its search engine Bing. The company said the change would be able to provide users with more tailored, detailed, and contextual responses to queries.

 

More than one million people signed up to try out Microsoft’s new Bing search within 48 hours of its launch, the company said earlier this month. Additionally, the revamped version comes at a time when Google’s AI chatbot Bard is still trying to find firm ground.

 

With millions of people on the waitlist to access the new Bing and no tough competition in sight to date, the revamped Binge is seen as a potentially lucrative opportunity for Microsoft. The Satya Nadella-led introduced its overhauled product – Bing – just a day after rival Google announced Bard, the company’s experimental conversational artificial intelligence chatbot service similar to OpenAI’s ChatGPT.

 

Google, however, suffered reputational damage earlier this month and lost about $100 billion in market value after Bard provided incorrect information about the James Webb Space Telescope being the first to take pictures of a planet outside the Earth’s solar system.

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